Tag Archives: print

Summer Break

On 13th April we held our Annual Print competition for the first time in two years, having previously been unable to meet in person due to Covid restrictions. There were no leagues, with all members competing equally, and 4 categories: open colour, open monochrome, nature and people.

Due to the competition being for physical prints I sadly have no digital images to show you, but huge congratulations go to all our winners which were:

  • Open Mono
    Bill Pickard with ‘Maasai Warriors’
  • Open Colour
    Gordon Mills with ‘Sunset Klong Muang Beach’
  • Nature
    Gordon Mills with ‘Dalmatian Pelicans Lake Kerkin’
  • People & Portrait
    Ann Bench with ‘We Can All Be Different’

In addition, we hold an annual Lakeland Trophy competition which consists of a panel of 3 prints depicting Lakeland or Cumbria, and our 2022 winner was Jeff Bagnall with ‘Wansfell ponies’ – well done Jeff!

Our season has now finished and we are embarking on a summer break. Although formal meetings won’t be taking place, Club members will be meeting regularly in small, informal groups for days out and details can be found on our private Photoshoots Facebook page.

Our 2022/23 season starts in September. Details of the new programme will be available on the programme page of our website shortly. In the meantime, we hope you all have a wonderful summer – fingers crossed the weather will be kind and we can get out and about with our cameras!

Guest speaker: Permajet

On Wednesday 25th November Club members were invited to link up via Zoom with Colin Hulley of Permajet for help and guidance to ‘Print with Confidence’. The in-depth presentation covered all aspects of colour management workflow, from calibrating monitors, through colour workspaces in editing software, to paper profiling, with the aim of helping photographers make successful prints.

I wish I’d heard this talk 7 years ago when I was just starting out on my own photography journey because I struggled for a good year with dark, muddy prints whose colours looked nothing like my screen. When I finally learned about colour calibrators and used a Datacolor Spyder I discovered my laptop screen had been set to a very cool temperature by the manufacturer and when this was corrected by the Spyder device the difference was like night and day!

As Colin explained, we also can’t print on paper the backlit images we see on our overly bright PC screens, so with the addition of turning down the brightness on my monitor and making sure I used the correct settings and ICC paper profile for my printer I was finally able to start printing more or less what I was seeing on my computer.

Permajet make a wide range of papers and the paper you use for printing makes a big difference to how your image appears. Some papers have a cool tone, for example, while others are much warmer. The choice of paper, therefore, makes a huge difference when printing things like portraits as skin colours will look different on a cool blue toned paper to a warm yellow toned paper.

I’m glad Colin mentioned, though, that no matter what you do prints will only be a close, not an exact, match to your computer image and you might need to tweek a little in Photoshop or Lightroom for the photograph to print out exactly as you’d like! Having a consistent colour management workflow, however, makes what can be the tricky process of printing so much easier. Our thanks to Permajet, and to Dylan for all his hard work in arranging the evening.

Our next Zoom meeting is a club competition with the theme of ‘Leading Lines’, judged by John Williams EFIAP/b, MPSA, DPAGB. Why not join us as a guest for what promises to be an entertaining night! Details on our membership page.